LIONS INSIDER

Broyles has successful knee surgery

Posted Dec 7, 2012

Rookie receiver Ryan Broyles can take solace in the fact that he doesn't have to go too far to find a guy that's been in his same shoes and has gotten through it.

Rookie receiver Ryan Broyles can take solace in the fact that he doesn't have to go too far to find a guy that's been in his same shoes and has gotten through it.

Broyles tore the ACL in his right knee in the first quarter vs. Indianapolis last week, just over a year after tearing the left one as a senior at Oklahoma.

Across the locker room and down a little bit to the left sits tight end Brandon Pettigrew's locker. Pettigrew suffered an ACL tear in his right knee in high school and then again on Thanksgiving as a rookie with the Lions in 2009.

Pettigrew battled back from his second tear and was ready for the start of the 2010 season. He caught 71 passes for 722 yards and four touchdowns.

"He's got a long road to rehab but he's gone through it before and, like I said, there's a decent amount of players that have gone through what he's gone through," Lions head coach Jim Schwartz said of Broyles.

"We have a couple on our team, there's a couple across the league. He's a really hard worker. He's strong."

Broyles had successful surgery on Thursday, and there's already had a bit of good news in that the surgery was able to be performed earlier than most ACL surgeries are because there wasn't much swelling in the knee. Doctors usually wait a couple weeks for the swelling to go down in the knee before they operate.

"In this case he didn't swell up which was a good sign; that's why they operated so quickly. So we'll just take it one day at time with his rehab but it's not going to be an overnight thing," Schwartz said.

"He's going to have a long road ahead of him. We'll be patient with him like we were last year and we expect him back and the field and we expect him making plays for us. Even be better than ever."

It will be a long road back for Broyles, though.

"I think it does make it a little bit easier if you have gone through it before," Schwartz said. "That it's a long road. You know that there's going to be no shortcuts.

"It's like going for a long drive. You just get in the car and know it's going to be 10 hours. You can't after 15 minutes say, ‘When are we going to get there?' Having the perspective of having it done before I think certainly affects that attitude."