NEWS

Offseason Move No. 6 - Lions Trade for DT Corey Williams

Posted Jul 9, 2010

The offseason move voted as No. 6 by the fans is the trade for defensive tackle Corey Williams.

The trade for Williams was Detroit’s first major move of the 2010 offseason. The Lions acquired Williams and a seventh-round draft choice from the Cleveland Browns in exchange for a fifth-round draft choice.

“Corey is going to be a great addition to our defense – he’s a very solid run-defender,” said General Manager Martin Mayhew following the trade.

“What I like about him most is his ability to rush – he’s a really good pass rusher. That was an area where I thought we really struggled last year and Corey is going to help us there. I think he’s going to be a big part of our defense this year.”

Williams is entering his seventh NFL season, so be brings a middle ground of experience and youth to the Lions’ defense.

Selected in the sixth round of the 2004 NFL Draft by the Green Bay Packers, Williams grew into a starting role as a defensive tackle in a 4-3 defense. After playing in 24 games with zero starts his first two seasons, he played in all 32 with 20 starts his second two.

Williams garnered seven sacks in each of those two seasons.

“With my ability to rush the passer and to play the run, I think I fit in (Detroit) real good,” said Williams. “(A system like this is) what I’ve been waiting on. Now I’ve got a chance to really just get off the ball and show my ability.”

Williams was traded to the Cleveland Browns in 2008 for a second-round draft choice. The move put him in a 3-4 system in which he was asked to play defensive end.

Though he started all 16 games in 2008, he registered just a half sack, following that up with a four-sack season in 2009.

“I played end the whole time in Cleveland,” said Williams. “My bread and butter is playing inside, but they had me playing outside.

“Everything is a lot quicker (inside) than it is at end. There’s less thinking. I’m the type of player – I like to just go. I don’t like to think, I like to go.”

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